Friday, December 19, 2014

Pixie Dust Whole Food Xanthan gum replacer

If you’ve been reading my blog for any amount of time (and thank you to those following from the beginning in 2006), you’ve watched me evolve from a blog who was following other bakers for inspiration to one that leads the way.
My tendency to research the heck out of a problem leads to gaps in my posting, as I research a rabbit trail of information to logical conclusions while striving to eat as cleanly as possible.
Then I try to figure out how to make sure the efforts can be replicated by you with ease, like this pixie dust xanthan gum replacer to replace GMO rich gums.

Are the gums getting you sticky? Try this alternate

Pixie Dust seed mixture to replace xanthan gum in gluten free baked goods from www.DrJeanLayton.com


You are BUSY folks after all.
So many have children and elders that you are caring for while working full time.
I relate, believe me, I relate, my girls, writing, teaching and practice all call for my attention.

Sometimes the gaps in my blog are just pauses when real life gets the focus.

Like the paucity of posts while I co-authored Gluten-Free Baking For Dummies
Gluten Free Baking for Dummies book Cover, Dr. Jean Layton's Book!  www.DrJeanLayton.com
I just didn’t have any more time to write here.
And sometimes, I’m in intensive testing of recipes, cooking and baking up a storm to be certain that the recipe works, every time.

When my husband began to react to the baked goods I was testing last year for the book, I just figured it was a quantity problem.

After all, who actually makes 12 kinds of cookies in two weeks typically?

So many cookies that their children plead for a simple muffin? Then the pleas for a pie instead of the muffins pouring forth from the oven in a steamy flood.
We ate our way through 25 pound bags of brown rice flour, sorghum flour, sweet rice flour, millet flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, 20 pounds of sugar and 30 pounds of butter in about 6 months.

That’s enough to make anyone not feel well, right?

Ed didn’t improve when we went back to our typical diet of vast quantities of vegetables, grass fed meat and organic dairy though.

Every time he ate a baked good, he reacted with the same reaction he has to gluten.
I don’t want to get graphic, let’s just say it is a massive downstream digestive purge and leave it at that. :)
Every Time.
Until one day I baked something using flax seeds as the binder, and he was fine.
Lightbulb!
He wasn’t reacting to the flours, he was reacting to the gums.
And if you’ve read my book, you see the transition there. Many of the recipes I created late in the writing incorporate flax seeds as the binder with wonderful results.
The baked goods hold up fine to being formed and baked.
Only one problem though.
Texturally, the flax-only stuff gets tough very quickly.
Wonderful on day one, not so much on day two.
So this past year, I’ve been playing with different seeds and such to figure out how to get around this problem.
Then I worked for a while longer to make it simpler for you.

The two concerns I hear about my blog and book is that you have to weigh everything and that you need to make a batch of my two mixes to bake most of the recipes.

I’m unapologetic about the need for a Scale.

Scale for perfect baked goods every time www.DrJeanLayton.comEverything about the chemistry of our baking depends on making sure you know how much of something is in your bowl. When you weigh, you are absolutely sure what is in there.

When you don’t, you can get problems like these oatmeal cookies Katie made.
On the top, she hadn’t remembered to pack down the brown sugar, she just scooped the cup. The cookies were ok but not fabulous.
On the bottom, she had weighed the sugar and created these lacy tuiles instead.
Gluten-Free Oatmeal Cookies from www.DrJeanLayton.com


Gluten free oatmeal cookies with the right amount of sugar  www.DrJeanLayton.com


Big difference, huh.
So weigh everything, it really is simpler and far fewer things to wash afterward.
What, you have a dishwasher that can gorge on all those big bowls and measuring cups?  Lucky you!
Me, I have a portable dishwasher and twin teens who resist loading.

The other concern about the mixes? I get it. Having to make one recipe to make another one is tedious.
But once you have a batch mixed up, you are good to go for a long while.
And isn’t it easier to just pull out two containers than a bunch of bags every time?
I truly wanted to create an all purpose mix in one big batch but love the flexibility of increasing the nutrition or the tenderness of my finished product by varying the amount of the two mixes.

When I figured out the recipe for a seed mix replacer for xanthan gum and guar gum, I wanted to make it simple.
So here is another recipe for a mixture.
This one you can prepare in minutes and then have it ready to leap into action to hold our baked goods together.

Pixie Dust xanthan gum replacer to the rescue!

When I get more time, I’ll be going back to remake all my older recipes, updating them to use this in place of the xanthan and guar. Yes, even my sourdough.

Feel free to use whichever color chia seeds you wish for this mixture. The cost difference can be substantial between the green/black and the white.
Remember that the pigment will still be there in your baked goods.
I made a batch up both ways, using the pale mix in white baked goods and the colored mix in brown baked goods.

Pixie Dust-
By ,

Whole food subsitute for the xanthan gum used in most gluten-free baking and cooking


Gluten Free Pixie Dust- Whole Food xanthan gum replacer from  www.DrJeanLayton.com

Prep Time:
Yield: 1/4 cup
Ingredients:
20 grams golden flax seed
10 grams chia seeds- black or white
5 grams psyllium husk
Instructions:
1. Combine seeds in food grinder
2. Grind till a fine powder.
Store any extra in a small jar in the fridge.


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